Bitchin Blonde
I have no idea what I am doing
Bitchin Blonde
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redsuns-n-orangemoons:

i-write-wrongs:

realest thing I’ve seen in a while

this was so amazing. so thought provoking. an eye-opening social criticism.
redsuns-n-orangemoons:

i-write-wrongs:

realest thing I’ve seen in a while

this was so amazing. so thought provoking. an eye-opening social criticism.
redsuns-n-orangemoons:

i-write-wrongs:

realest thing I’ve seen in a while

this was so amazing. so thought provoking. an eye-opening social criticism.
redsuns-n-orangemoons:

i-write-wrongs:

realest thing I’ve seen in a while

this was so amazing. so thought provoking. an eye-opening social criticism.
redsuns-n-orangemoons:

i-write-wrongs:

realest thing I’ve seen in a while

this was so amazing. so thought provoking. an eye-opening social criticism.
redsuns-n-orangemoons:

i-write-wrongs:

realest thing I’ve seen in a while

this was so amazing. so thought provoking. an eye-opening social criticism.
redsuns-n-orangemoons:

i-write-wrongs:

realest thing I’ve seen in a while

this was so amazing. so thought provoking. an eye-opening social criticism.
redsuns-n-orangemoons:

i-write-wrongs:

realest thing I’ve seen in a while

this was so amazing. so thought provoking. an eye-opening social criticism.
redsuns-n-orangemoons:

i-write-wrongs:

realest thing I’ve seen in a while

this was so amazing. so thought provoking. an eye-opening social criticism.
redsuns-n-orangemoons:

i-write-wrongs:

realest thing I’ve seen in a while

this was so amazing. so thought provoking. an eye-opening social criticism.
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8isexual8itch:

datunofficialdisneyprincess:

theincredibleelastigirl:

the-man-and-the-mouse:

even the princesses fangirl over peter
except aurora 
that bitch be faithful

look at phillip though

can you blame her?

Goddamn.Phillip could get the business.

So I went to Disney about a month ago and i got to meet aurora. she asked me and my mom if there were any “princes’” with us today. When I told her that I leaned more toward princesses she looked over at Cinderella sighed and replied with “yeah me too” and I think about that a lot.
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Good wifi on the Hogwarts Express this year
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2jam4u:

people I like casually reblogging me really ups my self esteem
2jam4u:

people I like casually reblogging me really ups my self esteem
2jam4u:

people I like casually reblogging me really ups my self esteem
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+
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theblackestwidow:

THIS MAN IS A GIFT
theblackestwidow:

THIS MAN IS A GIFT
theblackestwidow:

THIS MAN IS A GIFT
theblackestwidow:

THIS MAN IS A GIFT
theblackestwidow:

THIS MAN IS A GIFT
theblackestwidow:

THIS MAN IS A GIFT
theblackestwidow:

THIS MAN IS A GIFT
theblackestwidow:

THIS MAN IS A GIFT
theblackestwidow:

THIS MAN IS A GIFT
theblackestwidow:

THIS MAN IS A GIFT
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Black Teen Birth Rate Plummets to a Historic All-Time Low. Don’t let them try to put you down and lie to you any longer! Bill O’Reilly can kiss my ass
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eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence
eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence
eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence
eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence
eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence
eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence
eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence
eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence
eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence
eleanasound:

The Last Japanese Mermaids 
For nearly two thousand years, Japanese women living in coastal fishing villages made a remarkable livelihood hunting the ocean for oysters and abalone, a sea snail that produces pearls. They are known as Ama. The few women left still make their living by filling their lungs with air and diving for long periods of time deep into the Pacific ocean, with nothing more than a mask and flippers.
In the mid 20th century, Iwase Yoshiyuki returned to the fishing village where he grew up and photographed these women when the unusual profession was still very much alive. After graduating from law school, Yoshiyuki had been given an early Kodak camera and found himself drawn to the ancient tradition of the ama divers in his hometown. His photographs are thought to be the only comprehensive documentation of the near-extinct tradition in existence